Banned Buds Week

Banned Buds- Cannabis Now

What’s in a name? The difference between being sold in Oregon’s recreational cannabis retail outlets and becoming modern-day cannabis contraband.

In Oregon, several popular strains of cannabis can no longer be sold in the state’s licensed recreational cannabis shops under their current names, after those names were deemed to be “associated with minors,” or “toys and games marketed to or by children,” the state Liquor Control Commission announced last week.

Oregon’s liquor control regulates retail cannabis sales. And according to the OLCC, state-issued labels featuring 20 well-known strain names will not be allowed in Oregon recreational cannabis stores.

They include legendary Bay Area-bred Girl Scout Cookies, Mendocino County favorite Grape Ape, non-psychoactive, high-CBD strain Charlotte’s Web; and Star Wars-referencing strains like Skywalker OG and Jedi Kush.

The strains themselves can still be sold in stores – just not under the banned names. Retailers can choose to rename the strains, refer to them by initials, or apply some other “shorthand reference instead of the full strain name,” according to The Oregonian.

In other words, you can sell Girl Scout Cookies under “GSC” You could also call it Banned Cookies, or GS Cooks, or something else remarkably similar – just not Girl Scout Cookies. Same with Skywalker OG – You could call it Scott Walker OG and apparently be in the clear.

The OLCC has also banned two strain names that refer to other banned drugs.

The full list of banned strain names: Girl Scout Cookies, Grape Ape, Candyland, Charlotte’s Web, Cinderella, Dr. Who, Bubblelicious, Smurf, Bruce Banner, Death Star, Skywalker, Jedi Kush, LSD, and Blow.

Though we at Cannabis Now firmly believe recreational cannabis is not proper for developing brains – even if medical cannabis has had proven benefits for children – we find this all a bit patently ridiculous, not least of which is sending people back to their street dealers for “Girl Scout Cookies,” even in name only.

Therefore, we’re choosing to “celebrate” this ignominious occasion with “Banned Buds Week.” During this week we’ll be posting a series of strain reviews. You’ll learn more about each strain and just why removing its name from the annals of cannabis is boneheaded.

Help us celebrate Banned Buds Week by smoking along. Which of these strains is your favorite banned bud?

Chris Roberts has written about medical cannabis, drug policy, and legalization ever since spending a few months in Humboldt County in 2009, with bylines for the San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco Examiner, and SF Weekly. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @cbloggy.

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